2.12.2013

Optimal Care in Childbirth - Review and a Giveaway

Optimal Care in Childbirth - The Case for a Physiologic Approach
Henci Goer, and Amy Romano, MSN, CNM
583 pages

I have to start by saying this book is MEAT. It took me a great while to get through the majority of it - just because I had to keep revisiting information, fact checking, etc... It was quite a mouthful, and I am still trying to digest all of the information! 

That said, I love this book. It touches on so many subjects at the heart of United State maternity care, with the underlying tone that we are not providing evidence-based care in the majority of hospital births.  We all know that our maternal/fetal morbidity and mortality rates are abysmal when compared to other developed countries. And OCC works hard to try to get to the heart of those practices that are harming our outcomes the most.

They also don't paint obstetrical care as the problem, but obstetrical practices. Systematically, each chapter is broken down into 5 main parts. These are: 
  • Title and quotes from medical literature. The quotes are oftentimes chosen to show the gamut that obstetrician's points of view and practices run. 
  • The argument at large, citing the research of that given topic, translated into easy-to-understand facts and figures. 
  • Strategies for Optimal Care, or, how we can better our obstetrical care.
  • Mini-Reviews - a statement, followed by a mini-review of the medical literature available to us and what it shows.
  • References - cited sources for all of the numbers, facts, and information in that given chapter.  

It is huge, this wealth of information. Don't believe me how much information is in here? Take a look at the table of contents/list of chapter topics. 

Although I have read some of the scathing criticisms of this book, I think those nay-sayers are missing the point of it - this book is not here to cover every possible scenario of labor and birth, so those things that we may be doing right for certain situations will probably not be noted in OCC. Also, this is not a midwifery training manual, it is a supplemental discourse on standards of care - so you won't find information on stages of labor, anatomy and physiology, and how to time contractions.

I am happy to have this newest addition to my library, and I have already found myself using it for many situations that might warrant the wealth of information within it's bindings. During the review process, this book followed me into 4 different birthing chambers, found it's way into three obstetricians hands, 2 midwives hands, and a host of L&D nurses hands. Everyone whom I shared with planned on getting their own copies - and everyone was impressed by the information and how it is presented. 

If we are able to modify current U.S. obstetrical practices to reflect even a portion of the standards of care outlined in Optimal Care in Childbirth, America will see a dramatic increase in safety and satisfaction in terms of maternal and fetal healthcare. Some of the practices they promote, though, will be hard to come into practice - as they will require trust, patience, and a wholistic understanding of the human system. 

OCC gives me hope - hope that women and their care providers will find the information provided within these pages and begin a swelling tide of change in the United States - a change toward more Optimal Care in Childbirth. 

If you wanted to purchase your own copy - the authors wanted me to let you know that domestic shipping is free and discounts are available for multiple copies sent to the same address. Now.. on to a chance to win a copy!  

Giveaway
I am so thrilled to be able to offer this. Henci Goer and Amy Romano have offered a free copy to one of my readers. All you have to do is follow the rules below. #1 MUST be done. Beyond that, you can do any additional numbers for additional entries to win. PLEASE remember to create a new comment for each task completed, so that you get credit for it. If you are entering for your particular birth worker (doula, childbirth educator, obstetrician, PCP, midwife, DOC, etc..), then you can get an additional entry by telling us why you want to win it for them, and tell us about that birth worker! 
  1. Share this giveaway on Facebook or Twitter, then tell me you did here :)
  2. "Like" both Sage Beginnings and Optimal Care in Childbirth on Facebook 
  3. Tell me which chapter of their book interests you most and why
  4.  Tell me why your particular birth worker should get this book
Giveaway open to continental U.S. entrants only, my apologies all of my international friends. Entries will close on Feb 28th, the drawing will occur on March 1st, and I'll post the winner here. You'll have 3 days to claim your prize, or another winner will be drawn. Good luck!

35 comments:

Cindy said...

I shared the giveaway on facebook!

Cindy said...

I liked both pages on Facebook .

Cindy said...

There are so many chapters that interest me, but I think chapters 10, 11, and 12 on EFM, water and drugs in labor are particularly interesting to me as a childbirth educator.

Cindy said...

I'm a birth worker. I teach The Bradley Method of Natural Childbirth, I lead with two LLL groups as well as founding and leading with the Skylands NJ chapter of BirthNetwork National, and I'm also an aspiring Doula. Not only will I read and cherish the book, but I'd be happy to put it in my library and lend it to other birth professionals and clients. I would be thrilled to win!

Mishka Brownley @ Birth by Heart said...

I shared on my childbirth education page on fb https://www.facebook.com/BirthByHeart

Mishka Brownley @ Birth by Heart said...

I would love to read every chapter in this book, but the one that interests me most is chapter 10 on EFM. It is so routine and so difficult to shake the common perception that it is helpful or if nothing else, doing no harm! I'd love to read what OCC has to say on the topic.

bedheadmaestro said...

I'd love this book as a brand new student CPM and doula! The chapter on fundal pressure interests me most, because it is still being practiced where I live and I can't decide whether it's at least better than a cesarean (because it's been the last successful resort before cesarean.)

Kathi Valeii said...

I shared this on my Spirit of Ilithyia facebook page.

Kathi Valeii said...

I already like both pages on facebook. :)

Kristi said...

I like Sage Beginnings and OCC on FB
keendoula at yahoo dot com

Kristi said...

I shared on FB
I'm not sure if my first comment went through since I am mobile. Feel free to delete one.
keendoula at yahoo dot com

Kathi Valeii said...

At this point I'm most interested in Section I - Chapters 1 and 2 on the failure of obstetric management and obstetric research. Why? Because I'm antsy for some Henci Goer throw-down on the subject.

Kristi said...

3. It's hard to pick just one but I am interested in reading the section about the third stage of labor especially about if active management is better or not. Of course I want to read the home birth section.
If this comment is chosen, please send to my awesome doula Jessica.
keendoula at yahoo dot com

Kristi said...

4. If this comment wins please send to my midwife Sandra. Hopefully she doesn't have it just yet. I think she deserves it because she is an amazing midwife and a kind hearted person. She helped me so much during this pregnancy, and not just about baby stuff. She is such a blessing to the women in our community.
keendoula at yahoo dot com

Mommy Phears said...

I just shared this giveaway on my facebook page!

Mommy Phears said...

I have "liked both pages on facebook

Mommy Phears said...

I am particularly interested in reading section 2 and the chapters on Cesarean.

Buffy Owens said...

1. Done - happily shared on my personal page.

Buffy Owens said...

2. Done & Done - lot's of love & likes.

Buffy Owens said...

3. Favorite Chapter - all of them. But right now #2 jumps out. I am very curious about the limitations of research and finding out how to improve research.

Buffy Owens said...

4. Was actually planning on donating this book to the Pregnancy Project Library...a local group of Birth Professionals here in the Capital Region of NY. This looks like an excellent resource for learning & gathering the ability to speak more clearly with OBs.

taryn said...

Shared!

Jeanette McCulloch said...

I have shared the contest on Twitter - good excuse to remind everyone to read this important book!

Jeanette McCulloch said...

I have also liked "Sage Beginnings" (I already liked Optimal Care!) So glad to have found your blog!

Jeanette McCulloch said...

Oh, and the chapter I'd like to read is the one on homebirth.

YogiBarrett said...

I posted on Twitter!

YogiBarrett said...

I'm interested in it all, but perhaps the chapter that interests me most right now is the chapter on Induction, seeing as if we could reduce unnecessary inductions, we could reduce alot of the unnecessary interventions that come afterwards.

YogiBarrett said...

As for #4, I would read first, then share with all the prenatal yoga teachers that I teach in my trainings.

atightlyknitlife said...

Such an exciting give away. This book would benefit our new Birth Collective in Southern MN greatly. I've shared on FB and with the collective.

Kristen Burgess said...

Liked Sage Beginnings and Optimal Care in Childbirth!

Emily said...

I shared on twitter! @AnthroDoula :)

Amie said...

I shared on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/amie.norris/posts/617556281594660

Amie said...

I "liked" both Sage Beginnings and Optimal Care in Childbirth on Facebook.

Amie said...

I'm most interested in Chapter 19 (and seeing how birth politics are handled in this book).

Amie said...

I would give this book to my best friend and midwife Ranni of Mamatoto Maternity. She is passionate about homebirth and evidence-based care. She's currently shepherding a group of midwifery students and this would be a great resource for all of them.

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